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Image, Petr Kratochvil

Competition has inflated the amount and cost of political speech. These could be greatly reduced without losing any information.

Limiting Funding, 

​Not Information


Tracking the First Amendment's protections safeguards speech: 

guaranteeing at least one grant unit to every applicant,

but controlling the number of repeat grants using the criteria already in the Constitution

(see Limiting Repeat Grants and Applied Speech Doctrine) to limit spending. 

Amendment I allows limiting political speech by time, place or manner in accordance with the Electoral clause.

 
Article I, Section 4:

“The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives,

shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof;

but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations…”  


Competition has inflated the amount and cost of political speech.

These could be greatly reduced without losing any information.

Keeping the focus on the public's information need keeps total quantity in perspective. 

First the government allocates total funding for the following year, then parcels it out by projected elections, appointments and acts of Congress or the Executive, so total funding allowed for a particular year, Act, election or appointment can be exhausted.

The public can’t be subjected to unlimited invasions of our time and our homes. 


Since the annual allocation may not be so small as to limit views,

sacrifice will be infrequent unless the public calls for a reduction.

If the total funding limit is ever reached, no-cost methods and speech in private venues may still be used.