Convenience is not a tremendous loss to protect liberty.


Liberty is an unbearable loss to protect convenience.

​​​Voting as a Civic Duty


Representative government can't reflect the will of the majority unless the electorate votes.

Voting percentages have been dropping in every state.

Today these sometimes fall below fifty percent.


Better Voting Turnout points out the main reasons for voter apathy: 


  • unavailable or unreliable self-governance information (see Section 1)
  • uncompetitive races due to gerrymandering (see Section 3)  
  • uncontested races (seeThe Fair Elections Clause)
  • lack of accountability

      (see theAccountability and the Public Elections Clausepages)


And it’s not just apathy. Poor electoral mechanics directly or indirectly abridge
(see theMaking Elections Workpages).


When corrective measures fail to pass or prove too weak generation after generation, to continue to experiment wastes the people's time and money and can expose the nation to jeopardy (see
Voting Safeguards in History). And caselaw limits our options now, while the electorate continues to endure an inadequate electoral process. These are signs of a problem too pervasive and enduring for the states to address successfully.


But that doesn’t mean we have to live with apathy and poor turnout.
Mandatory Voting vs Enforcing Voting Rights compares two approaches and finds that the more democratic one is also more effective with certain safeguards, covered in The Voting Abstention Clauseand No Penalty or Force. Once again, these clauses involve fundamental principles of governance.


There is a sacrifice involved in these clauses, but it’s not a sacrifice of liberty. It’s a sacrifice of convenience – the convenience not to bother, not to participate at the most basic level. Convenience is not a tremendous loss to protect liberty.

Liberty is an unbearable loss to protect convenience.